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Paperbark

Posted in leenerrerter, Plants, River Placescape, River-Forest | 0 comments

Canoes were constructed from the paperbark tree  which was in plentiful supply in the area.  They were  probably up to 5 metres long and made from thin strips of  the bark tightly bound and lashed together with string for  strength. Canoes were used to travel both long and short  distances to the offshore islands.

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Black peppermint

Posted in Bridport Walking Track, Forest Placescape, leenerrerter, Plants, River-Forest | 0 comments

Grandfather and grandmother peppermint gum were culturally  significant to the leenerrerter clanspeople both as a ceremonial tree and burial tree, and remain so for their descendants . The leenerrerter people practiced complex forms of reverence  towards the remains of the dead. One practice was to place  the deceased in an upright position in the burnt-out hollows  of the living peppermint gum using lengths of brushwood or  spears. Strips of...

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Spiky Tree Fern

Posted in Plants, River-Forest, Wildflower Reserve | 0 comments

The hardy and adaptable Cyathea australis or Spiky tree fern is found at Tree Fern Gully on the River-Forest section of the circuit.  It has roots and hair like follicles on its trunk giving it a rough texture and it is adaptable to a variety of climates and soils.  Ferns are also amongst the oldest plants in the world dating back to the Carboniferous period  360 million years ago and the Spiky Tree fern is wholly protected in...

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Sheoak closeup

Posted in Plants, River-Forest | 0 comments

The She-oak  ( Allocasuarina littoralis )  ‘closed’ forests are remarkably quiet.  It is the most drought resistant  tree in Tasmania.  The needle like foliage is a dull dark grey.  The fallen needles create a soft cushioning mat.

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White gum

Posted in Plants, River-Forest | 0 comments

White gum ( Eucalyptus viminalis), are dominant on the river reserve near the Ada Street shelter. Alongside the river there are moisture-loving herbs, ferns, sedges, rushes and reeds. Paperbark swamplands occur where the Brid River flows into Anderson Bay. A riparian corridor with dense plantings of a range of small native trees and shrubs is important to the restoration of the Riparian reserve. Riparian revegetation practices helps stabilise...

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